No I.D.

Real Talk on Content Creation with Ty Buckner

December 13, 2023 Jerome Davis Season 9 Episode 4
No I.D.
Real Talk on Content Creation with Ty Buckner
No I.D.
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Buckle up for an enthralling comedy ride with the multi-talented Ty Buckner, the Virginia-born comedian who's shaking things up in LA. We get to know Ty Buckner, the man behind the laughs - his journey from the military to the comedy scene, his comic influences like Bernie Mac and Eddie Murphy, and his aspirations to be a screenwriter. But it's not just jokes, folks. We delve into the real talk on the pressures and competitive nature of the LA entertainment industry. Plus, we take on the controversy of the Big Slick Comedy Show with Ty's candid insights.

The laughter continues as we bring in the hilarious Black Man Bill, who paints a vivid picture of his early stage blunders and how they shaped his comedy. Get behind the scenes of his skits, inspired by his own life experiences, and the tricky business of winning likes, shares, and views on the social media battlefield. Lastly, we sit down with the dynamic Tyrell Bupner, a rising black creative talent. Bupner sheds light on his multifaceted journey, the significance of community support, and the impact of social media on his brand's growth. This episode is a whirlwind tour of comedy and content creation, filled with laughs, insights, and the real talk on making it in the industry. Tune in and get ready to be entertained and inspired.

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Speaker 1:

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to another episode of the no ID podcast. Here is I. You want an only drum Davis to host the creator of it. I have here a young man. He is an actor, he's a creative, he's a comedian, he's a writer. This man has several hats into this entertainment industry. He is a porcimus native move to LA and is taking over right now from the skits to the stand up to. That's the right in the production. If you have not seen this page, I'm going to tell you right now. Go see his page right now. The one and only Ty Buckner. What's going on, baby?

Speaker 2:

Go home with your mind.

Speaker 1:

Hey shit, how you feeling man?

Speaker 2:

I'm feeling good right now. Monday, and then the dude let's have a video.

Speaker 1:

I'm happy to get you up here, man. I appreciate you. I will just let people know. I found this man over the weekend on social media and I was just scrolling, scrolling, scrolling. I think it was just on the score page. I was like, okay, comedy, chat to. I saw a couple of the skits. Was it T away? You did the Academy.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

T away, t away Academy. I did my research and then I saw something very interesting. He is a Virginia native.

Speaker 2:

Yes, sir.

Speaker 1:

Homegrown talent from from the 757 areas now making noise over in LA. What, what? So how did you get into the whole creative space and how has the transition been from moving from VA over to LA?

Speaker 2:

So it's a long story, but I'm trying to make it show as possible. So I was in the VA until I was like 18 years old and after that I joined. I joined the army, right and then that's where, like like 2018, I started making these comedy videos and stuff like that. Like you know, I really like this. I started taking the serious little bit more serious and then I think about right now, 2020. My contract was ending with the army. I was like I really don't want to read this, so I decided to, like um, explore my options as an actor and stuff. So that's what I did. I found the T away school. There was an LA and I got family out here in LA and basically everything just fell into place after that.

Speaker 2:

So it came to act there, still doing the skits and stuff. And then I got because I'm in the T away. That made me want to do on stand up comedy. So that's how I got here right now.

Speaker 1:

That's what's up, man, so you. So how is the the LA circuit as far as acting and comedy? How is that?

Speaker 2:

It's. It's a lot of us out here trying to do the exact same thing I'm doing is like I want to say it's hard, but depending on who you are, it is kind of challenging. Everybody want to be an actor. There's a lot of people that still doing clubs, stand up clubs, so it's a, it's a challenge right here.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I can see. La is where you're supposed to make it right Like this is.

Speaker 2:

That's what they say. That's what they say. It's a lot of people out here that hasn't made it. You got to have, like, you got to have connections on connections, just to get featured in a commercial or even a small role in a big movie, mm hmm.

Speaker 1:

So it was some of the actors that inspired you growing up.

Speaker 2:

That's the thing. This was never a part of my own my repertoire growing up it's happened, naturally. It's like I never thought about being an actor growing up at all.

Speaker 1:

So what was in your repertoire growing up? Was it sports, was it music? Was it?

Speaker 2:

I would say it was sports. Um, the first thing, well, I grew up. I was an artist for a while. Like always used to draw everything and I was. I wanted to play basketball, but I was too skinny, so I instead I decided to run track when I was in high school, so that was really kind of like my first love. But but yeah, I was. I mean, I was always fun my whole life. That was nothing, but I was never late, right, I think enough doing any comedy, anything like that. I was doing it because that's just my personality, that's just why I am a regular, you know.

Speaker 1:

It's crazy, say trap, because it seemed like you just hit the pavement running when you got the LA.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's what's up, man. How has the so you doing? All three, how has that been treating like? I know I do stand up myself. How's stand up like what? What inspired you for? Stand up? Because that's a.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's.

Speaker 1:

Two different lanes.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, see, stand up. That's a different story. Cuz Roaring up. I did love what the stand up like my favorite commiss to watch like Bernie Mac, I Grew up on him. I like watching some of the old Andy Murphy stand up skits. Um, who else on ASJ? I watched a lot of on ASJ and Death comedy jam. No, I just love watching all those just seeing these people Just doing stand up, making a crowd laughing, everything just by telling stories. I was always interested in that but I never thought about doing it myself, which is crazy.

Speaker 1:

I don't think we all thought about doing. Stand up a thing one day. We just like you know what. Either I'm gonna take a class or do a overnight. We're gonna see what this yeah, we're gonna see what this lands. So, yeah, I understand. And you, you, you write too. So like are you more like a? You know, we had the big straight recently with yeah so I wasn't a part of it.

Speaker 2:

I'm a. I'm a. I'm at UCLA right now taking classes to become a screenwriter. So only thing I've written so far I'm on my way of writing a spec script for a feature film and and Only other thing I wrote was like a couple of shorts. So other than that I haven't really wrote anything major yet.

Speaker 1:

Many shorts is major because you see what shorts and reels and skis is doing for country Wayne and Drew's. Yeah, yeah, I might have to disagree with the Little part on that one brown man In terms of me, okay.

Speaker 1:

Okay they are writing for Tyler Perry presents mission impossible. You know, you know Maxine's baby, who man I like. As far as acting goes, though like cuz, I know is different variations of acting got method acting, which is what Jared Leto does. That I believe. What? What is your Going for roles as far as being active? What's your thesis behind that I was? What's your synopsis behind going behind these acting roles? Do you research them? Is there like a roles that you won't play or you want your?

Speaker 2:

time cast them. Right now. I do have a manager. We're working on like getting me in like anything possible right now, because, like the strike just finished, so reach on. I was like, give me anything you can I'll do.

Speaker 2:

But on the way, for me as an actor, the way I like to act is kind of like it's called the myosin of technique. That's when you connect with your senior part in everything. But you know, since kovie everything's been on self-tape. So I can't, I have nobody to act with, so it's basically like whom I'm gonna act with. So then I have to really like try to get into character, whatever that catch on playing is. And and one role I did tell my manager I would never want to play is a slave. I Never, I've never, want to play asleep. It don't matter where I'm at in my career. I'm never, I've never, wanted to play a slave, because we just like I'll talk about that we all want to get all like you know, political and not like that it's ain't, it's ain't the time for. But I never play asleep, that's it.

Speaker 1:

Man, you, you're not lying about that. I don't know what the fascination with Cinema and slavery is.

Speaker 2:

No need for movies. That's how I feel.

Speaker 1:

Exactly, and I wrote a joke about how do you audition for a slavery movie? This is for me speaking, I like. How do you Get into the mindset to be a slave Like you know what? I'm gonna kill this role. If you're extra in a slave movie, you're. Your title in the movie is slave number one or slave number two is a shit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I would hate to see that in my, in my credits for real, but no, I just I've never done it oh.

Speaker 1:

If you can envision yourself playing any role, though, or playing along like opposite of another actor, who would that act to be and why?

Speaker 2:

That's. That's tough on right now cuz my favorite actress, chadwick Boseman you know we're not with him anymore, so but he's not with us anymore but, um, I would probably have to say on maybe Samuel Jackson. I play like play opposite of him some type of way, because I love his acting like from when he first started you know that man was taking any role he could when he was younger and now look where he at now. So I love to play opposite of him. Somebody else are probably say is on, like you stand field. Yeah, I probably play opposite of him.

Speaker 2:

And, um, for a role I really want to play because something about me, I love bio pics and that's the reason why I chaired. Boseman is my favorite actor because he been like he been in 42 Marshall, he did the James Brown story and like I love all that. I love all that bio pic stuff and the temptations is my favorite movie, and so I Will say a role that I would love to do, and because people said look like him and I like have mannerism like him, I would love to do Eddie Murphy bio pic If they would ever make that. That's, that's, that's my go-to role. I gotta do something like that.

Speaker 1:

I can see that. I can see that that's crazy.

Speaker 2:

Who knows?

Speaker 1:

Shit. We still waiting on the rich of pride. Oh my feet. We Nick Cannon, marlin Williams, mike Alps of Auburn room with the plan man. We have yet to get it. So I don't know what's going on. That's crazy, say Sam Jackson, because I think a lot of people don't respect the genius behind Sam Sam Jack. Sam Jackson will put out Star Wars and then another woman call your motherfucker in the same Because you know, you know he played Nick Fury in all the Marvel movies Great.

Speaker 2:

And what a lot of people don't know is like Nick Fury was originally a white man. I think about David Hasselhoff in the earlier on, in the early one. So the fact that Samuel Jackson is taking over his role as a black person just changed the whole dynamic of that. Like nobody really nobody really talking about that for real.

Speaker 1:

Nobody talking about it. Well, I mean, just watch some with Sam Jackson I can't pronounce it where he was had dementia. He was trying to solve his nephew's murder. I had just discovered it on Apple TV Polygamy, gray something like, yeah, but I'm a great.

Speaker 2:

I have seen that a while back. That's a good one, right?

Speaker 1:

That's like you know another actor. I think people don't put enough respect on us. Two of them forest Whitaker and Jeffrey right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, for real and Don Cheeto. Don't you? Yeah, don't you. He's like he need all the flowers he can get right now, because he is up there for real.

Speaker 1:

If you haven't never seen anything with Jeff right, you want see some region watch. Oh gee, he was really out there. And Pelican big playing basketball yeah, he did murderers and felons like he was really out there acting and cussing them out and they respect him so much he played basket out. If you look at Don Cheeto hotel Rwanda, he did one of my favorite comedians and personalities of P D Green. He's been all across. And you look at, uh, like actresses you have Viola Davis, yeah, I'm even throw Queen Latifah there. Who am I being? Is?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, she's different. Like she don't get enough credit, as is to eat for a for real. Like she did so many great things for like her own, her like role of playing any characters. Like very, very broad, she do anything, which a lot of people don't really see. That, though, oh.

Speaker 1:

They don't when you got. She's done Movies, so she didn't. Comedy drama, sapphire. She's done romance. She's done television shows, talk shows, rap music, hip-hop music. She's sung opera for a little bit. She's done musicals. I'm like, okay, all right, yeah, I mean we gotta give her flowers. Oh, the same way, you know it's an amazing thing Is I know we talked about the type of movies that you wouldn't be in, like that one movies, like a slavery movie would never want to do, but it's a genre of a movie that you wouldn't do. Is it like that you would?

Speaker 2:

I don't think there is like any drama that wouldn't do, because I like comedy, I could play comedy, I could do drama, I like romance, so I don't think there's any drama that wouldn't be willing to do. I love to do horror too, I mean, why not so?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think. I think that's a market that Jordan Pilla has tapped in for black people is he's actually he's done this thing and being a comedian, a writer, actor, do so, he's doing it. I'm gonna be honest with you. I think that might be your, the Jordan P Hill. Thank you going down that pattern, brother. Yeah, so have you ever done comedy, nva, or have you just done strictly in LA?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, just been all in LA. I haven't been, I haven't got to being to the jeans since I've been here. I've been like two years. Now I'm planning on going back. I do have a couple people that's like Really telling me that they have, if I ever come out, the VA is their home book a show for me. I'm like I appreciate that. I'm really excited. But you know, audiences tough out there, you know. So I gotta, I gotta get my jokes ready, you know.

Speaker 1:

Virginia's weird. I bet it's weird. He's fucking weird, bro, like they want you to be clean but dirty. Yeah, they want you to be sexual but not sexual it's like you gotta do yeah. Have you ever experienced your first bombing on the stage? Yet, like your first bad set, we was like you know what.

Speaker 2:

Maybe this shit ain't it I mean I would call it a bomb, but it was a set idea, it was for for an organization I mean I call black man Bill and Mm-hmm, they had this. They had this like little fundraiser thing for Juneteenth. It was day before Juneteenth and so I went out there. This is like an outside stage. You got people everywhere. So Tell me why I have one part of the one part of the outside laughing, and then the other part wasn't laughing at all, and so it's like it was so confusing, right.

Speaker 2:

So people that was sitting in front of me won't, none of them laughing, but the people to like my right side, all of them was cracking up, so I will call it a bomb. At the same time, nobody in that area was last, so I started talking to the people over here. I'm like how y'all doing this, though he says y'all don't want to laugh. So I started talking to them, you know, but I would probably categorize that I wouldn't say it's a bomb. At the same time. It is because nobody was left, but I still had like a few folks left.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's the weird part. Like you may get the left side rolling, the right side is like yeah.

Speaker 2:

Tell us something funny.

Speaker 1:

And then the skits that you do, right. How do you come up with the ideas for the skits and Like what? What goes behind these kids as far as the production of writing, the execution? And have you ever got mad because you're used to a certain amount of views, likes and shares. You'd never gotten that same view like a share.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So All my ideas come through life experiences. I'm gonna say that right now, like almost every video you see, that happened to me in a real life some type of way. And so my first I would say my first viral video that like, yeah, that I really Sort of get more attraction was I've been in a video with a old dude went how old dudes walk up to you say random stuff, and I just did that just for fun. That happened to me basically I work this job and it's dude I work with. He just came up to me, said something, I don't know what he said, left and then walked away.

Speaker 2:

I'm like, what was that? Like, you know, I gotta make a video out of this. And so me just playing around like I don't make a video, it got so much trash. I'm like, okay, that's nice. And then it was other videos I did. That I knew was that I knew that was funny. Then again, no traction at all. Nobody like really shared, nobody liked it, nothing like that like okay, so I See it, I got a. People want one thing I noticed that my, all my fans, they like, they like on short videos, like if it's more than no, more than 10 seconds they probably won't watch, because you know people tension span because the tick tock is very short. Now They'll watch a video and then skip right to the next one. Nobody trying to sit there watch a full video all day, unless you like really somebody you know.

Speaker 1:

I think I get them in the first 30 seconds. Yeah, yeah, like shit. I think Vine did that. Like that, Six second clips. I think that's what messed that? I got my cut. I was you that this will fuck this up. It was fine. Six seconds in the Instagram. Let you start doing videos and now it's either a real or short. You can't even post the regular post. Now they make you do a real. So yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I don't know, try to get people to come in and view the stuff and leave. That's it. They just want to use the likes.

Speaker 1:

Never had motherfucking Kevin hard up on this shit, so I was playing, yeah, I think. Oh, yeah, we're going to watch this shit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was not a thing. I mean that's, that's it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, man, realism is what you said as far as your skits, is that the same thing with your company? Like realism, do you tap into the real, the stuff that happened to you, the relatable stuff that's happened to you. That may have somebody else in the crowd to.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, most of my jokes are kind of real. Yeah, most of my jokes are real. But you know, as a comedian it's some things that I could say the truth but it's not funny. So I got to be in the just a little bit. You know what I'm saying, just a little bit.

Speaker 2:

I'm going to say it right now. So it's one joke that I do often where I talk about how my grandma sent me to a black church, a black Christian church but she's a Muslim, right, and it gets. It gets the crowd every time. I'm wondering, like I said that to myself, why she sent me to a Christian church when the whole time she's a Muslim. But I was just joking Until I had a recent conversation with my grandma and she was talking about how she was thankful for, like, still living, because you know she's older now she's thankful for still living. She prays the Almighty God a lot. I'm like, oh snap, so my jokes really are true, because this whole time I didn't think she was a Muslim for real. So I'm like, ok, so that's the joke.

Speaker 2:

I could say that's really the truth, but it is another is another joke. That is not the truth at all. This is on. It's a joke where I talk about being in the army and I was talking about how you know it was tough for me because you know I'm skinny and all, so I can have these heavy bags and I can never keep up. That's not true at all. I just I just say that because you know it's a funny joke, but I didn't really like it in the army. I was like I'm not, I'm on the brad, but you know I was good. Let's just say that I was good.

Speaker 1:

Oh man, it's nothing, as long as it's not like too much fat on to it. It's like it's not believable. It's believable because you're a friend. Like I got a joke where I said my mom booked me at a black church and the church they was coming up to me and give me words of encouragement. I think my mom didn't book me at a black church. She booked. I didn't get booked at all. I was in a black church crowd at a bar.

Speaker 1:

And that's when they was giving me the words of encouragement. So that's when I was like, oh shit, you know, and I bomb so bad and that's how I started this podcast is because of that bomb. So that bomb made no idea. Man, is there any celebrities that you've worked with or ever got like a star struck with since she been in LA? Is there? Have you ever seen any? Open mic scenes.

Speaker 2:

I've seen a couple of celebrities. They're not like real big celebrities but they're you know they're. They're unknown. So it's one guy, one of my promoters, fargis Mason. I've seen him on Def Comedy Jam and then now I'm like, I'm like I'm on good terms with him, so he's I'm going to say I'm a star struck, but I like he's somebody that I knew. I don't really get star struck often, but who else have I worked with? It was a yeah, it was a couple of celebrities I worked with that I wasn't really a star struck, but it is one person I have seen. It was Thundercat my. He's one of my, he is my favorite artist, I don't. I never seen him like, I never talked to him anything, but it was so random.

Speaker 2:

I was driving I think I was driving to work one day right and I seen him walking down the street. I'm like who's driving? Like who's that doing the noodles Dressed? I look closer and I'm like, oh shoot, that's Thundercat Bruh. I was. I was so star struck I even thought about turning around, turning my whole car around, and go get a picture with him. That's how star struck I was. I call on my friend. I like it, bro. You'll never guess what I just see? It's only I'll call my girl. I said you're gonna guess what I just seen something. I call everybody because everybody who knows me know I love I'm a huge fan of fun, okay. So I'm like that's like the only time I ever been star struck.

Speaker 1:

So it happens. Excuse me, I'm so fucking Jerry Sanfield. One time at the movie will like in Connecticut and I knew it was Jerry, cuz the security was walking through him and shit and I was like fuck yeah. And I was like I don't even know about your ass, will picture something. But you know you're struck. You start, you like In your mind but not a him, but really he's right in your face. I'm the cat. That's great. You got good music taste then.

Speaker 2:

Yeah yeah, he's very. You know, I grew up my grandma and all Blurred. Yeah, I grew up my grandma, so my brother, the first, the first um album I ever heard was a temptations album.

Speaker 2:

And I thought it was like a brand new, brand new band at the time. I heard them because I didn't know nothing Like. It took me a while to like actually know like who music or like where music started from and all because I didn't grow up with people my own age. I didn't start listening to that till I was probably like in middle school, so growing up on this like people from the 90s to from the 80s, 70s, because my own I live with my cousin also and she was born in the 70s and now you know, I mean she listed to like early hip-hop and you know, thanks to the cabinet, came out in the 80s. So it took me a while to Tell me why don't like know my own, my own generational music. So, yeah, my opinion is like so diverse so Anytime you get in my car, just you don't know what you're gonna listen to next.

Speaker 1:

It's uh, likewise I've been. You talk about thunder cat. I listen to gregor reporter and sting and yeah, like it's, it's, it went. I think some older getting older. I don't know what's going on. But uh, yeah, that's it. You don't know what you're gonna get man, you might get money back, get one minute and he might get hauling oats.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I got it. Thank you, the scraps you put.

Speaker 1:

Thank you the scraps. My personality is like all right. Well, man, I could trap with you the next Singing along. You're gonna look at me like what the hell you playing? I don't know man. This is, this is my car. You know it's my playlist. So yeah, I'll get you, man, what's the best advice that you've gotten since you've gotten to this creative space?

Speaker 2:

Hmm, I'll say the best advice. It happened when I was at school. It was, um, I'm not I'm not gonna say word from word, but it's something in the area the best advice I ever got was just to have fun, does it? It's? It's the most simple advice I ever heard, because it's most people you'd like if you were a new actor or something like that. They got there trying to be very specific and they try to like, really get that role. But if, if like the director or cast not ready to see that you have fun with the role, then you'll, then they'll remember you because I got. It was a couple times where I have been told that they just said I was having fun just because of my personality. Even if it's like I'm crying or I'm being like I'm I'm being shot or something like that, if it's a drama role, I was still having fun with it. I wasn't like being too, you know, too serious, you know, so just be loose. So that's not like the best advice I ever got.

Speaker 1:

The best advice I got is when you get into this, you get this is a passion project. Um, and Bernie Mac I add Bernie max thing on when he said fame comes before money All right, so if you're looking to make money in any of this right now while you're starting, it's not gonna happen, it'll come. The fame gonna come first, the recognition. So people might say, damn, that's taz, I saw his skit. That's a boy who grandma was a muslim and he went to a christian church. That's taz who saw ramen noodles and noodle hair on the street to work. And this was gonna happen first and then the money was stopped coming in.

Speaker 1:

But If you, I think if you uh, have fun that's one of the things I always tell anybody that's getting. I just do comedy, um, but if anybody's getting to anything, it was one have fun like this is this isn't Some shit that you got to go on there and go be serious or time. If you have fun and project it to your audience, like you doing your skits, like you've done in your movies and how you doing your writing and a doing your stand-up, your audience, well, I should be like damn he, like he having a good ass time. So then they'll have a good time. So it just, it's the energy I having fun. So, yeah, you're a good dude, bro. I hope if you come to va, uh, or if I go to la, you know we'll link up with something.

Speaker 1:

Get on the show, um, because I'm trying to support any black creative, especially coming from doing what you're doing, doing three, three lanes and, like I said, I see great things. I said you was the next Jordan Pia, but really you just tap, buck me, you might not, might. You will surpass a Jordan Pia one day. So Appreciate that. Yeah, man, um, if anybody wants to follow you again, contact with you. What can they follow you at?

Speaker 2:

I will say if you want to get a contact, you should follow me on my instagram, because you Tyrell Now, for If you just want to like, do anything with terms of business, you have to get my email, which is Tyrell bupner, one at gmailcom. So that's why I had all of my business, regardless of what it is. So, yeah, that's that's where you get in contact with me.

Speaker 1:

You in contact with him, go to his page like share, comment, subscribe rate. He's very personal, you know. Like I said, I think I hit him up probably saturday, saturday night.

Speaker 1:

And you just instantly. It was like bet, all right, we can set it up on monday. And I was like aw man, that's a bet. So I'm not bullshitting you guys. I've never bullshitted anybody on this podcast or anything that I do. So Tyrell's up next. He's probably just next right now. He ain't up, he's just next. So I'm gonna stop saying that and get his man his flowers.

Speaker 1:

And if you guys want to see anything that I'm doing is comedian Rome. Uh, follow that page. That's the instagram. Twitter, tiktok, no, id media. Tv is youtube, but you can also get that on instagram and facebook as well too. Make sure you like, share, comment, subscribe, support black creatives, support myself. And tack, who both trying to make it to the point where we can uh flag kite down to the next generation, some taz and rom. So Hell yeah, you guys ain't learned that this man literally is a virginia nato if he's in la doing his shit. So, so that's just speak something for you. Trying to make it, we are not trying, he's making it, we, we making it. So, ty, I appreciate you, brother, I'm gonna go ahead and Preach aw man, you understand baby.

Speaker 1:

Let's get this.

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