No I.D.

Branding in Wrestling: A Candid Discussion with Naja Sism

November 27, 2023 Jerome Davis Season 9 Episode 1
No I.D.
Branding in Wrestling: A Candid Discussion with Naja Sism
No I.D.
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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Get ready for a spectacular conversation with the incredible Nigah Sism, a wrestler whose journey in merging his music character with wrestling persona for branding is truly inspiring. This episode unfolds with Nigah's fascinating discourse on the significance of face paint in wrestling, its influence from his favorite wrestlers and how it has become a part of his unique branding. He also reveals the story behind his viral video with his son that has garnered over a million views and discusses his commitment to Platinum Championship Wrestling. 

As the episode progresses, I recount my personal experiences and the rollercoaster ride of returning to wrestling in 2020. The journey was marked with challenges and victories, from being booked on multiple shows, challenging for world championships, to selling out arenas. I also share the thrilling story of my match with Alex Kane and how it has brought me a step closer to my dream of wrestling overseas.

In the concluding segment, Nigah and I delve into the crucial aspects of maintaining a strong and quality-driven brand in the wrestling business. We explore the pitfalls of putting too much emphasis on rankings and lists instead of personal brand development, discuss the importance of professionalism and consistency, and conclude with some invaluable advice for aspiring wrestlers. This episode is a goldmine of insights and experiences from wrestling veterans, sure to inspire and guide anyone aspiring to make their mark in this sport.

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Speaker 1:

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to a brand new episode of no ID podcast. Here I have here. I can't even say phenomenal, I want to say crazy. I'm giving this man his flowers before we even start the podcast. I see nothing but great things with this man. I've seen him. It's highlights on YouTube. I've seen the highlights all over on Instagram. I found him off a black wrestling. You get Instagram page. The great Nigah Sism.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I appreciate that. Great introduction, wonderful introduction. Maybe sound bigger than I am, but yeah they man.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I see it man. I'm a fan. I became a fan. I think you had a video that went viral where you were wrestling your son and then I just tap my son.

Speaker 2:

Let me explain it. The video went viral. My page alone is up to almost 800,000. It's about an 800,000. But there's another page. You took my video and posted on Facebook as their own and it has. I think it has over a million. Last time I checked it was around 700,000, but that was a couple of weeks ago. Then another page posted on Facebook too as their own video, but they did tag me and that got over 20,000. So collectively on the internet it is well over a million views. And that's just actually one of my fans and he's the son of one of the photographers that film that actually shoot PCW Wrestling Show. It's her son, so you can hear in the background come on, tray. So that's her son. When he's a big fan, she sent me pictures of him posing like me and it's just, it's crazy, it's inspired. You know kids and I get it at all the shows like kids coming with their faces painted and stuff like that. I love it.

Speaker 1:

The face paint. Let's start there. We don't go all over. How did you come about with the face paint, like, what is? Who inspired you? What inspired you?

Speaker 2:

It's not that complicated of a story. Growing up, my favorite wrestlers were the guys with the face paint staying warrior, great motor, the road warriors, you name it. I love guys with face painting. Then when I first started wrestling, I was into music and a part of my music I wanted to do something that kind of set me apart and make me stand out. So I added a little face paint and my music character, my music, my character as a musician, kind of just merged with my wrestling character. And I'm always thinking branding and marketing. I don't think like just like an indie wrestler. I'm always thinking what's, what can be marketable, what can be branding wise? They got the logos, you got the shirts, you got the colors, it's, it's marketable, definitely.

Speaker 1:

Hell yes, Sting great Muda, I would say road warriors. You named a couple of great ones. Man, how did you get started into wrestling, though? Like what made you wake up one day and do that?

Speaker 2:

I have been a wrestling fan since I think I was about four years old and what would happen is I would like watch a lot of the same stuff over and over, because we would go to the, to the store to get, you know, rent DVDs and rent stuff, and I would just, you know, they don't always have new stuff, so sometimes I just rent the same thing over and over.

Speaker 2:

But I've just always been a wrestling fan and like I told you I was doing music here in Atlanta and I was performing at a venue and I saw a wrestling come across the big screen and I was like where's that at? What's that? They're like oh, that's wrestling. They train here on Tuesdays. I was like really, I'm coming. They was like you're a musician, you're not coming to wrestling. I showed up Tuesday and that Tuesday and literally I was doing everything. I was because I've always been into martial arts boxing. My background is in martial arts boxing, captain of the wrestling team in high school, all of that. So I already had a little natural talent.

Speaker 2:

I've been in my mind, I've been watching wrestling and studying it all my life, so it literally came to me like that.

Speaker 2:

I wouldn't say the psychology came to me like that, not in psychology, but the moves, the bumping. Because when I first started wrestling I was having 10, 15 minute matches with Vets and we were just calling it in the ring and it was easy like butter to me. No planning anything out. I had a best of seven series with a guy named Phantom who did like to plan anything. So literally we had seven matches of just beating the hell out of each other. No calling, no planning, doing a lot of crazy stuff. You see on TV now reversals, all that crazy stuff we were doing. And without planning it out, it was just us going in the ring and that was like me six months into wrestling, damn.

Speaker 1:

I went to wrestling school for one hour.

Speaker 2:

Speaking of a wrestling school for whoever's watching, if you're in Atlanta, decatur, stone Mountain, covington, coyne, georgia's area. I am one of the trainers at Platinum Championship Wrestling PCW's wrestling school. We train on every Sunday, wednesday and Thursday. We have a good hold on the basics, but we can teach every element of wrestling, whether it's branding, marketing, promos, everything. We do it all.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's actually very important. I commend you for sticking through. I went one hour and 40 of that was on the phone trying to figure out if I'm going to actually do this. The other 20 was me actually pulling up to the driveway and I was like you know what? I'm going to go ahead and tap out on this one.

Speaker 2:

It's not easy and it's not for the week, and I mentor a lot of young talents right now.

Speaker 2:

Talk to a lot of young guys now and the cassette, the they have it easy now. They don't know they have it easy, but you know it's easier to get your name out with social media now. So many different promotions to work for and everything. But a lot of the young talents now have become entitled. After six months, three months of training. They think they're good, they think they're the best, just because they can do some flips. But they still don't have the psychology. They still don't understand the business. And that's what we're running into with a lot of younger talents now. That's just starting out. They want it right then. And there they want it with their six months of training. They're not willing to work for it, they're not willing to grind for it. A lot of them aren't going to make it because they they're not willing to put the work in. They think they deserve it within a year.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's true. That's just like with me and company. You get some cats, they'll get like a good five minutes set. They could shoot a Netflix special with five minutes like bro. It would be an ad for every time you say the sentence. But it is what it is, man. You know what I do want to say. I want to give you a compliment. Your move set closely reminds me of AJ Styles TNA Run, when they actually went over the spike when they first were starting off.

Speaker 2:

He's a big fan of his and one of the bookers here in Georgia who I really always take advice from and has been around forever. He does gear. He still does AJ Styles gear to this day Rick Michaels. When AJ Styles had his first tryout match in WWE. I think like 2002-2003. He had that tryout match against Rick Michaels. So Rick Michaels is a legend here in Georgia and just speaking of AJ I just had to bring that up but somebody I've always studied and loved AJ RVD.

Speaker 2:

I'm a AJ RVD, bret Hart, shawn Michaels, ricky Stembeau type of guy. When I'm ring-wise that's what, that's where I put my mindset. As far as my in-ring work Character work I like the guys with the face paint and all that, the colors and all that but wrestling wise I'm looking to Shawn Bret RVD, AJ, and I don't like to necessarily take from people when I do what my move set is up. I like to. I'll take from somebody, but I'll make it my own First.

Speaker 2:

It's like Leo Rush does the bottom rope thing, where he springs back and does the stunner. Well, I do the bottom rope thing, but I'll come back and do a clothesline. So you know I'll take some things from some people, but I always make it my own. I'm not gonna do exactly what other people do and some people say, well, it's wrestling, you know it doesn't matter about the move. It doesn't matter about the moves, but one part that makes me stand out. I'm a smaller guy so I have to do things that makes me stand out. And one thing that makes me stand out is being creative in the ring and doing having a regular move set. But my move set is different from everyone else's move set.

Speaker 1:

Thanks. How has been the, the wrestling grind from, you know, graduating from wrestling school and into the level that you are at right now and then progressing on to like a bigger territory, a bigger market, like a maybe.

Speaker 2:

AEW or M-PAC or NWA. So what happened for me when I first started? I didn't understand the business and that's why I'm on Younger Talus now, because I was just wrestling at PCW and was like this is great, this is it. You know, I didn't know anything about indie wrestling. I didn't really even ever think about getting signed. I was just doing it for fun. And then Xavier Wood started to train with us for a while. That was when I was just brand new. He had just. He started training with us right before he got signed to WWE and he really like took me on his way, like right, and took me to a ring of honor show. He always talked great about me because he was able to see that best of seven and he's like I can't believe they're having these matches and not calling anything.

Speaker 2:

They're just literally going in there wrestling. And he took to me and I always respect that. You know that was a big, big deal for me, but at the time I didn't know how big of a deal that was, that somebody on his level would take the time to really so into me and really push me and all that kind of stuff. I didn't understand the business. So I started to venture off from PCW and go a couple other places, started to get pushed, started to get championships and stuff like that. But then I got an opportunity with music to travel overseas and do a tour overseas. I got booked on an international tour. So I was like life is kicking my butt right now. I'm going to step away from wrestling, go do this tour, then I'll come back and eventually I'll start back wrestling. That never happened. I took a break. I came back in 2020. As soon as I started training to come back in 2020, first I came back, it was in December I came and watched the wrestling show. I was like, hmm, because PCW had been gone for a while, they came back. They got a new building. I was like, oh, they can do this. This person can do this. I started to talk to some of the talents, I started to commentate and I was like I guess I can do one more match. This is 2020. I was like I guess I'll do one more match. So I started training just for one match.

Speaker 2:

March 2020 happened. I got into a bad car accident. Top car got total. I couldn't train for like four or five months because my back was so messed up. So you know, I had just started training to come back. So then I had to train to come back from the back injury. So I had my first match in January, january 8, 2021. First match back.

Speaker 2:

I wrestled for like four months in PCW. I didn't really wrestle. I wrestled maybe one show. I didn't wrestle for a couple of shows. I wrestled one show. I had two matches here and there, but I was really starting to get good. But in my mind my cardio wasn't where I wanted to be. I just was doubting myself. Then Rick, speaking of Rick Michaels he came. He's like hey, you should come to Adarchy because he's booking Adarchy here in Georgia, used to be NWA Wild Side, which is where AJ Styles, r Shroof all of them got there starting. So he was like you should come on. He's like you're good, I promise you you're good enough to do this. I was like, oh no, I don't feel like I'm in the best shape, blah, blah, blah. I just was doubting myself and eventually I got on and started wrestling at multiple shows.

Speaker 2:

That's the thing you know, I'm challenging for world championships here here there. It just gradually started to happen and if you would have asked me two years ago, would this be going on now Main event in multiple shows having Nick Patrick's retirement match Within two and a half years? I've done all this. You know I've made events at the biggest shows here in Georgia, sold out arenas. A couple of weeks ago we sold out the Eastern downtown Atlanta me and Owen Knight over 1,200 people. So you know, none of this was planned, none of this was in my head, none of this I thought was going to happen. It just happened.

Speaker 2:

So, after putting in this hard work over the past two years after about a year of putting in that hard work and starting to really get booked. I said I think I can really make it in doing this. So the ultimate goal is for me, if I ever get to wrestle on a big stage like WWE, wow. But my main goal is to get overseas. Get some years overseas really wrestling, doing some getting them wrestling here in Japan. I would love to get the opportunity to do impact impact NWA, aew and overseas. Those are the main things that I would like to accomplish before my career is over.

Speaker 1:

Like I see now, like everybody's kind of moving away from the big box of WWE and they're going to more tours of AEW ROH. You see the relationships being built with Impact and New Japan and DDT and I'm just saying there's a big surgeons and I also see a big surgeons and a lot of more black wrestlers being featured, a lot more. You know Bobby Lashley Street, profes Rich Swan, alex Kane, shane.

Speaker 2:

Teller Nigga Alex Kane shout out to him. I had an awesome match with him. What was that? In July? Great match, great match, and that's another thing that really pushed me along this year. For people who didn't have their eyes on me. A lot more eyes got on me after that. Alex came back earlier this year and it was a month before he won the MLW championship, so that was a big deal for me. So respect, all respect, due to him also.

Speaker 1:

Big respect to him. He's the reason I started watching MLW. Hopefully I get him as a guest up here, but I definitely need to get Nigasism story out a lot more. Thank you.

Speaker 2:

Speaking of Alice, that was a great match. I loved it. It reminded me of like a Brock Lesnar versus Daniel Bryan or Brock Lesnar versus Ben Baller. It was that style of match. You know, I had to fight for Munder. I had to use my speed to fight against those suplexes, his power and everything, and we had a banger.

Speaker 1:

Hell yeah.

Speaker 2:

And I got that rolled up in that pen no rematches, no rematches. I can't get him Get it back I left that MLW championship on the line. I'll come to you. Court Bauer, you can just go ahead and book that match. I'll come on in.

Speaker 1:

MLW. Be lit man. I saw they brought Don King back this week. I was like damn. I remember that first feeling you had when you stepped in the ring and that first feeling you had when you got that first W or that first don't.

Speaker 2:

The first one is how I feel every time, because I'm always nervous Every time I go out.

Speaker 2:

I'm never. I'm never like oh, I got this, I'm cool. I'm always backstage stretching for like about an hour doing pushups, before I go out stretching, praying, getting my mind together. I'm nervous for this in front of 500 people, 1,000 people, 20 people, 100 people, because I'm my worst critic. And not only am I my worst, my worst critic, I'm also how would I put this? I'm never. I never settle. I always want to be the best. I always want to steal the show. I don't care if I'm in the opening match, I'm gonna care if I'm in the last match. I always want to be the best. I don't know if I ever get out of that. I've heard some of that saying you know, I used to want to be the best, but I realized I'm gonna get paid the same regardless or whatever. You know, I've heard that, but I just always want to be the best on the card.

Speaker 1:

I don't think nobody is in the business not to be the best Trust me.

Speaker 2:

There's plenty of people who are just in this business because they like doing it. They like wrestling. Because I was that guy when I first started. I just liked wrestling, I wanted to be good and I wanted to be the best where I was at, where I was wrestling at. But I didn't have this big aspiration of I could be doing this overseas. And I would hear my trainer say it. People say you know you can go as far as you want in this business. I'll hear them tell me you know he can be a big star, he can go wherever you want to do, whatever you want to do in the business. And I'm listening in my head I'm listening. I'm like, yeah, but I'm doing music too, like you know, it's like I never I didn't realize what I had when I had it, but now I do, and you know that comes with maturity and a lot of

Speaker 2:

stuff that the younger talents are going through now, like attention tantrums or temper tantrums or, you know, being upset about certain things or thinking they should have won this award or they should went be winning this championship, and stuff like that. You just got to put the work in instead of complaining about it. Shut up, go train, get in the gym and get better. That's what I say. You're doing too much of this instead of doing too much of this. You're doing too much of this instead of running the ropes and training. Keep talking. All that talking is why you're not getting to the point where you're supposed to be at. It's a big problem in the industry now, just because you got a couple cool reels and you can do a couple a lot of cool flips and stuff like that. See, I can post reels doing cool flips and cool moves and stuff, but not only is the real of the clips and the moves cool, but the whole match, the story of the matches was good. The story of the match, the flow of the matches, was the good part. So that's what I mean by they post the cool flips and stuff. But then you watch the whole 10 minute match and the match is sloppy as hell they strikes the car of them. But they did a cool flip. But they look like they've been doing karate at the local Kroger. They look like they're learning how to fight at Kroger. You know what I'm saying. This is like stepping game up. That's what I tell everybody.

Speaker 2:

I do a lot of talking but I back it up because I train every week. That's not a week that doesn't go by on train. As good as I am, or people think I am, I train every week. Still I'm not that bad. That's like, oh, I'm not taking that, I'm not doing that. No, we were working on body slams off the top rope in practice on Thursday before I had my three stages of hell match against over night. Friday night we were literally doing a Ric Flair bump off the top rope, you know. So it is what it is. Too many wrestlers now out here talking. Stop talking, go train, live up to the hype.

Speaker 1:

That's it. I think we like it more of a push button era, like an air fryer microwave, then put on the oven and cook it on the stove Type.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

But it wants that shit so fast, man, and they don't realize like it's a grind to get to the top. Sometimes you get cash. You meet that could be 20 plus years into the game and they'll still go hard as hell and they'll get that big break and they're still going hard as hell and it's like you can't have it now Exactly.

Speaker 2:

He just got it and 99. And now he's 41. Main eventing. So no one can't tell me like it's never. Anything is possible if you put the work in. You become undeniable, which not only with your social media and your presence in the ring and everything. You just become undeniable as an undeniable package your branding, your body, getting your body in shape, chris Jericho's in his 50s, claudia all these people are wrestling in their 40s and 50s and they're in their prime and they're not slowing down. So all these young people thinking, oh, let the young people get a chance. Blah, blah, blah. Make your way. You know, fight your way through. Keep the door, keep the door in, break the glass ceiling. You know what I'm saying.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, my thing is I always tell people shut the fuck up, put the work in and it'll speak for itself.

Speaker 1:

You may not win that award, but you want to be that guy that if, even if you didn't win the award, you'll have people come up to you like me damn, you should have won that one. That should make you even go even harder, going on to the next time and the next time. And if you just shut the fuck up, focus on your craft, drink water and mind your business, I promise you in any music wrestling, even in comedy and podcast, you'll go so far.

Speaker 2:

Speaking of podcasting something I'm about to get into, so when I start my new podcast, I can have you on as a guest.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I got you Hit me up. I believe in returning the love, I believe in giving the flowers out there and I believe in just helping out because I believe that the entertainment gods, as I like to say will bless us back. You know what I mean. Like, if you bless me with 30 minutes of your time, I can bless you with 30 or more minutes of my time. That's plain and simple.

Speaker 2:

And now speaking, when you say how awards and stuff work and how people are oh, you should have got this and you should be here and you should be good. So just to bring it up, the black. What is the black top 500? Yeah, it is.

Speaker 1:

Like the.

Speaker 2:

PWI 500, so they had the BW 500. And of course it's not official. It's not an official list, right? It's not an official list that a committee came together and they, they went and checked records and they went and checked vote, they voted and all that kind of stuff, and then they came over. They came over with it. It's one guy with the pain. Okay, I'll follow with that.

Speaker 2:

But everyone was kind of like sending me the list. How are you not on the list? You've beaten a lot of people on the list. You've beaten people in the top 100, the top 200, 300, a half, you know, through the whole list I've beaten people and my brand is way stronger than a lot of people. I was like. You know, at the end of the day, my brand, who I am, shines through all of that. It doesn't matter if I'm on the list, not on the list, because everybody knows who deserves to be in what, who don't deserve whatever. You know, it is what it is Because, at the end of the day, I'm still gonna be the greatest, the baddest, the best.

Speaker 2:

I'm still gonna be main eventing. I'm still gonna be walking around here with plenty of belts on me. I'm still gonna be selling plenty of merch at shows. I'm still gonna be doing everything I'm doing. I'm still gonna be in the main event. Have that? People on that list never even wrestled in front of 500 people? You know they never been in the main event, they never sold out of the main event, they never held world championships. So at the end of the day, it's a list.

Speaker 1:

I don't care about it.

Speaker 2:

Talk your shit, it's a list and I'm proud of everybody that was on the list, but hey, it's a list.

Speaker 1:

It's other people's opinions.

Speaker 2:

And guess what this is? This is a business, and for me it's been a business. That's why my merchants I'm always selling shirts, I'm selling autographed pictures. Okay, I'm booked and busy. Brother, I'm on a list or not?

Speaker 1:

I like it, man. How did you do that, that three stages of Hill match? Well, one night man cause you jumped off some shit. You taped them up to a table. Now you know what?

Speaker 2:

So it's pretty much all over social media right now and it just happened Friday and you know, somebody sent me a video of it and I was like hey, so many people got videos. You know we're in the digital age where I was like, well, dang, I want to wait till the show come out so I can watch it, just to kind of like that. The first match was a regular match and pretty much we went back and forth. We wrestled each other about 12 times this year. We had everything between me and Owen. We wrestled for the first time last July or June, something like that, and after wrestling him once I was like wow, it's something there Like we can make magic together. Last November I challenged him to the best of seven series at Southern Honor. We had the best of seven series at the end of that Southern Honor in February, I mean nobody has tested me in the ring like that.

Speaker 2:

This guy is super talented. If anybody deserves to be on a main stage, he is one of those talents, because it's not just the end ring, it's the personality. He can talk, he can do it all and he deserves every accolade and every spot that he's in right now. Then we end up having another big match at a Comic-Con and like Tupelo I think it was Mississippi Tupelo or something like that it's hundreds of people there. That was great. Then we came back, we did it again at a festival here and for his part, anyway, we just couldn't get away from each other. And after that best of seven, the crowd started chatting. We won a tag team. So we had a great tag team match against the Washington Willets Top Tag Team here in Georgia for years. Then we challenged for the tag titles. That's when he turned on me. So all of that led to the. Finally we got the end.

Speaker 2:

It started in November last year. It ends in November this year. So three stages of hell. First match was back and forth like our normal best of seven style matches we had back and forth. Then it turned into a false count anywhere. We battled all over the arena Chair shots, trashcans shots, low blows. Then it went to the I quit match. What you said I quit match ended how you just the strap to the table and everything like that there was I don't want to get too much away.

Speaker 2:

We just going to let people watch it when it comes out in a couple of weeks.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's long-term storytelling. From what I heard, yes.

Speaker 2:

And that's one thing, a lot of these talents who think they are good and think they are great. I said, yeah, you've done a bunch of flips, so you do cool stuff, but how many long-term stories have you been in? How many promotions have been able to build a story around you and then bring that story to the end? And then how many promotions have been able to put you in a main event spot, build the promotion around you and all that? So yeah, you've had a couple cool matches and you did a couple good flips and did a couple little good spots and all that kind of stuff.

Speaker 2:

But it's not about their wrestling, it's not just about that. You got to be able to tell stories, promos, you got to be able to bring it all into a package. And so you know I'm tested. I'm tested in every aspect, from the promos to the backstage stuff, to the main events, to the tag team matches. I've been tested, I'm prepared. So I always tell, every time I do an interview, I say I don't know what's next, but I do know I'm prepared for whatever is next and I'm always going to be prepared.

Speaker 1:

Hello you, hey.

Speaker 2:

before we end the interview, we're about to wrap it up, cause you know what? I got a photo shoot in 30 minutes with my new faction.

Speaker 1:

Show it.

Speaker 2:

My new faction is coming over. We're about to get these new shirts. We got to get the photo shoot with the new shirts and everything. Shoot some bing-yats.

Speaker 2:

Hell yeah, cause that's my next step, you know building. Everyone in my faction has been wrestling, less than you know, two or three years or whatever. Some of them have been wrestling for a year or two. Everybody's pretty much in the rookie or a coming up status. So I'm starting a faction, not what established guys. I'm starting a faction with four younger talents that I can elevate. So this, as we build this story and we start this group, I'm going to elevate them. Where am I mad? I'm going to bring them with me. We're going to have on the shirts, we're going to have on the hoodies. So, yeah, I'm about not only just building myself up as I am on this wrestling journey. If I see somebody who has the talent, I'm gonna build them up to and elevate them to.

Speaker 1:

Maybe you ever need a comedy writer.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, oh, we gonna talk about it too, because if I have a Show called its variety, which is sketch comedy, we the first season I did by myself, I did multiple characters, film the whole thing myself. The second season I did a cast, I had a full cast. So I've already written the third season and we were planning for that to get beyond, to be so that's my whole other side of thing, my whole TV show. It's variety. So maybe I'll get you linked up on that and you can see what what I got going on with its variety and then outside it's variety. I'm not just a wrestler, I'm in school. I'm In school for my second degree, media. I'm in school for my second degree, media Communication. So I have a podcast in class, I have social media classes, I have film and Video. All that, that's everything in my degree, you know, encompasses it, encompasses all media. So, yeah, I'm in school, I'm running a production company, I'm running a wrestling company and I'm doing what I do as a wrestler also. So the grind don't stop.

Speaker 1:

Mm-hmm 25 25 man. If the people want to get in contact with you, reach out for two for interviews, get merged. What do they see you at on social media?

Speaker 2:

So we're gonna keep everything. I'm gonna tell everybody just IG right now, because when you go to the IG, in the bio it has a link tree and the link tree has tiktok. It has everything that you need to know. But if you want to email me directly for an interview, everything's not just a nod to system at gmailcom, simple, in aJ I s, I s m at gmailcom and then if you want to reach out to me on social media, let's just keep it on Instagram because I can connect you to everything else on Instagram.

Speaker 2:

On Instagram is the Nodgism, so T he NHA, as I s m the greatest, the best, the best, just hit me up on Instagram. I do follow back. Social media has been crazy for the past month because, like you said, that video went viral. I've never had that much interaction till this day. Every time I go on my Instagram, there's more than 100 lights, more than 50 comments that I have to go through and just Respond to. Because I try to respond to every comment, I try to acknowledge every like and everything like that, because, um, I feel like being interactive with your audience is how you continue to grow your audience.

Speaker 1:

When, when new people come on your page and they see oh he's interacting with all his everybody comments and he's interacting and he's.

Speaker 2:

That makes them want to interact with you.

Speaker 1:

So you know big facts, big face.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, follow the Instagram D nodges ism message me, I'll respond, or email me, I'll respond and support, support, support, support, support, support support support.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I heard all the messages them. You can't. You're not a wrestling fan of. You heard this one. You are going to be a fan of a nodges ism. He also gave a lot of jewels about how to not Get a big head, stay humble, how to stay true to the craft. The passion he had with his whole conversation shows not only is he professional wrestler, musician, businessman, but he's an artist. He cares about his craft.

Speaker 2:

And the biggest thing I could tell people who are trying to get into wrestling you got to come into the mindset of this is a business. How you carry yourself backstage, how you carry yourself when you walk in a room, it's always, always have a business mindset. You don't see me go to shows without my own virtual, my own shirt on um, and I'm just experienced. For the past two and a half years I experienced a lot of younger talents lose their cool backstage or, uh, you know, just lose it. I mean I'm not gonna go into details, but just stay professional, guys.

Speaker 2:

Um, do what the booker wants to do. I mean certain things you can question, but one of the most things, best things you can do as a young talent, where you going to a new show or you're trying to get over and all that kind of stuff. You know you can add your little two cents in, but always be professional and try to do what the booker says. Because you listen to the booker the first time he's probably gonna have you come back because he feels like, okay, I can work with this kid, I can coach him, I can, he's gonna listen. You know, whatever you know, you know most bosses aren't gonna hire somebody that's always gonna be combative and always arguing all would, never on time, and all that kind of stuff. Be on time, be on time, be a be about your business If you're entering the wrestling business is called the wrestling business for a reason.

Speaker 1:

Fuck yeah, got to hear that. And to my comedians out there All podcasts is the entertainers. Listen to this man right here and, instead of think about wrestling, think about the comedy aspect as well too.

Speaker 2:

That's it. I released a video on my production page, my production company page. I'm starting to do tutorials on that page and the first one I tutorial job was consistency, and consistency is key with everything you know, whether you're a comedian, actor, business owner, entrepreneur, hairstyles, whatever Consistency is what one thing that will help drive your brand. If they know that you're consistent with posting and everything that you do and the quality of the work Is consistently grows, then I'm gonna purchase whatever your product you buy and I'm gonna use you. I'm gonna hire you because you're consistent. If you're that consistent with what you're doing, I know you'll be consistent for me. So that's that's my Key thing for everybody. Whatever you're doing, just be consistent and always stay quality. Don't just throw stuff out there just for the sake of throwing it out there. Be strategic with what you post and what you do. I'm strategic with everything I do. I.

Speaker 1:

Like Thank you so much. Now just says them for being, I guess, um, I really appreciate the jewels that you drop and I hope you continue getting your flowers and being a OG of the game. I'm not talking about original game, so I'm talking about offering game To those that's willing to go underneath your mentorship. So I appreciate you so much, brother. I'm going to stop the recording.

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