No I.D.

GhettoRauchi

August 19, 2023 Jerome Davis Season 8 Episode 6
No I.D.
GhettoRauchi
No I.D.
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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Get familiar with the multifaceted and hilarious Ghetto Rache. This episode brings you up close and personal with the comedian, author, actor, writer, and producer. We kick off with exploring his unique moniker and his audacious journey from his first open mic night to the comedic force he is today. Rache unravels how he cultivated courage to take the spotlight and the vital role his supportive community played in finding his audience.

Brace yourself, as we traverse through the gritty challenges of stand-up comedy. Ghetto Rache gets candid about handling tough rooms, the art of winning over diverse audiences, and the reality of bombing. He underscores the importance of perseverance in honing one's craft and the power of a loyal fan base. Furthermore, Rache enlightens us on the nuances of preparation, practice, and collaboration in stand-up comedy and the secret to establishing a resonating rapport with audiences.

Last but not least, we delve into Rache's ventures beyond comedy. We discuss his books, shoe designs, and the anticipation around his upcoming movie 'Hitalik 3' and comedy special 'Ghetto Ratchi' on Amazon Prime. A notable mention was the positive impact 'To Be' has had on Rache's career, providing him with a platform to showcase his work. To round off, we turn the spotlight on Rache's signature blue robe with a yellow belt, and how a professional cowboy hat would be the cherry on top. Tune in for a laugh-out-loud conversation with Ghetto Rache!

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Speaker 1:

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to a brand new episode of the no ID podcast. This is season eight. Ladies and gentlemen, we're interviewing a comedian, a published author, creative actor, writer, producer. I don't know how many hats this man has right now, but I came across them through a friend. I followed his Instagram and I became instantly hooked. He is a legend. He is a legend, hey man. I got people out of flowers before you know, while we here on this earth, you feel me the one and only ghetto, rache.

Speaker 2:

Man how you.

Speaker 1:

Well, we was talking earlier off the camera man. I just want to know, like, how did you come up with the name Ghetto Rache? I hope I pronounced that right.

Speaker 2:

You said it right I got the shirt on too, just so people can see it. Ghetto Raches G-H-E-T-T-O-R-A-U-C-H-I, ghetto Rache, rhinos and Liberace itself. I ain't gay None of the gist there but I do wear a robe. The name ghetto Rache man. I came up with that name when I was coming out with my comedy stuff. But let me tell you the history about it.

Speaker 2:

Behind that I had a homeboy I was in the military with we good friends and anytime we were hanging out and we saw something crazy or ghetto, like we would say N-word Rache, nigga Rache, that's what it was like. So I knew I couldn't name my comedy special nigga Rache. So I said I'm going to name it ghetto Rache. And that's how I came up with the name ghetto Rache. And then I decided to also call myself that ghetto Rache. I'm going to say because my comedy is raw, unfiltered, true serum, tight, tan. That represents ghetto Rache. So that's how I came up with the name ghetto Rache. It was by default, because I didn't want to name a comedy special N-word Rache or nigga Rache. I didn't want to do that. So you know. And then I didn't want to make white folks uncomfortable. They had to say it. So I said you, said I, because I know they would be like in the word Rache, you know, so, um, so that's why I named it that man, and that's that's how I got it. Definitely man.

Speaker 1:

So how long have you been doing comedy? I'm glad you asked.

Speaker 2:

August, 24th of this month, will make eight years. So make eight years. And how did you get your start? Was it like did you start?

Speaker 1:

when we started eight years ago. So was that military time or did you start after the military? I started way after the military. Yeah, I started way after the military.

Speaker 2:

I um.

Speaker 1:

I went to open Mike at this place called the second wind.

Speaker 2:

There was a bar in carboro, north Carolina, I know forget. I went on a. Um, I went on a Wednesday night. I leave. The week before I had went up to another Mike just to see how it was right. So the next week I made my mind if I was going to go to that open Mike, and that day, man, I it was something that kept saying like pushing me to get to that stage. I didn't get no cold feet, I won't come up with no excuses. It was almost like I had a appointment I had to go to and I had to be there. And that's when I got to the point where I was like.

Speaker 2:

I'm not going to go to the media and that's that was the feeling. So I that whole day was just like you going to this Mike, you going to this Mike. So I wrote down some jokes on the napkin that day, man, and I never get that. That day it was just unlike any other day I experienced. It was just something, was just like making me go, like you got a destination to get to. So, like I said, I wrote some jokes on a napkin. I wrote like five, six jokes, right.

Speaker 2:

So I get there, man, I get that kind of I guess I was the last comment to get there Ain't nobody, ain't nobody there, but white folks, white people, that's it. I'm the only black person I go to last. So I get up on stage, rome, and I'm telling these jokes and then white folks looking at me like this. It's like never you better get us a laugh. I mean I'm going joke after joke. I'm thinking this stuff will be funny. Nobody's laughing. So I get to my last joke, right, and I see a little small prayer. I see God, I'm going to say this joke and if nobody don't laugh, I'm going to take my black ass off the stage. I never do it again Never tell nobody, I try. I said this real vogue, a joke. And these two white boys I know that this day bust out laughing in the back. I looked up at God. I said I found my audience. I've been doing it ever since.

Speaker 1:

You prayed to, god would have run to you I sure did. I sure did.

Speaker 2:

I said hey, I showed it, man, because I was like people say I'm funny and I'm getting up that thing. You know, when you do stand up for the first time, we're really mimicking and imitating what we think other comedians do.

Speaker 2:

I know it's like that. Nobody, nobody tells you that. You just say, hey, open mic, go try. Nobody really talks to us before we go on stage. You know what I'm saying. Like, really prep us.

Speaker 2:

I'm just going off what I thought they did on regular television. You know what I've seen the famous people do and man, I get up there, man, I'm talking. I mean, when I say quiet, it was quiet. It was almost like I was in court in some little small redneck town and they just gonna decide my fate. They was not laughing, they just looking at me. I mean all of the comedians, everybody. It was just like this. I said joke. So I said a joke. I was like you talking about uncomfortable. I Just, I mean, you know I'm going through these jokes. I'm like I know this funny cuz I said it in real life. I said God man, look, he's like, hey, they don't laugh, I'm gonna hell off this thing. Hey, I told that joke, man and all. I Was glad they laugh, man, because it did not laugh. I don't know if I still be doing Santa, but no of me, I would have came back again anyway, but that laughs, I was hooked. After that I was good.

Speaker 1:

I had a similar experience Recently, recently, and I asked you. That's the joke I sent you in my DMs, and it's more the white rooms that I've been to. This is what I learned about universal jokes. Um, the white rooms that I've been to, they will laugh, they will celebrate, they will do everything. Black people do not laugh. We gotta either insult you or make a noise. That's all we do. Yeah, let you know that you good, but I did a wrong one time and I was a open mic and I had on my Malcolm X hat. I got the big X on. I had this fresh Muhammad Ali shirt I didn't bought from the mall.

Speaker 1:

I'm walking up in there and I should have researched this bar. It was called bad habits. I should have researched this thing before I even stepped foot in there. Get in there. I'm like I'm gonna get five minutes. See another comedian go up there. I mean he's firing off some of his best stuff. Nobody laughs. I get up there, start telling jokes Nobody laughs. What pissed me off was I came out of it like I left. I didn't stay for no more, nothing. I came out, the bitch and the white lady came up to me. So you're so hilarious, you're so funny. But when I was walking through from the, the bar to the car, I just saw nothing but red Maga hats. I was like, yeah, I didn't piss off this crowd so bad, like Lord.

Speaker 2:

That was a white crowd.

Speaker 1:

That was a white crowd. Hmm black, the black crowd. We got another over my hand. Virginia Beach Jam Cafe, bro, kevin Hart, might eps can come up there and do a whole four hour special. You would not get no laughs. They're interested, you crack jokes, they cracking crab legs. That's when you sit down. They like man, you're funny. I'm like, bro, why you didn't laugh. I was.

Speaker 2:

And this is what's the name of this place this place.

Speaker 1:

The black one was Jam Cafe.

Speaker 2:

And this is Virginia Beach.

Speaker 1:

This is Virginia Beach.

Speaker 2:

Okay, I'm gonna keep that in mind. You know I got family up that way, so I'm gonna keep that in mind. All in the tired water, I'm gonna keep that in mind. I'll never get if I go up there.

Speaker 1:

I'm gonna tell them. So I hit the stage.

Speaker 2:

Look, you gonna be cracking a crab leg. I'm telling you, I sit beside you, damn ass. We're gonna make, we're gonna do some laughing, so we're gonna do something. I'm there, I'm gonna sit up here all day, y'all looking at me like I'm retarded. Hell, hell, no, we gonna do stuff. I got to sit at the table with the mic in my head. He crammed it. Tell joke, that's what the hell we gonna do. Oh, hell me, come all the way up there and hurt my feelings. Oh, black folks at New York say something. Black people will crush your spirit in a comedy room. They will crush your spirit. They will make you go home to voice your wife, find a new career. They will make you forget comedy. They will make you never, ever, ever decided to do that. They were hurt your feelings. Well, I'm telling you, I've been in some black rooms, man and I'm I'm like in my own trial. What, what did I do?

Speaker 1:

Damn. I told the dude.

Speaker 2:

One time I said man, I said, well, y'all ain't laughing. I had to literally make these people laugh at a show one time. It turned out to be good, but I had to improvise. Yeah, one black guy said me you ain't that fun. I said your mammy ain't that damn fun. And then that's how we got, that's how I got. I had to bring him to life man.

Speaker 2:

But, um, it's true With black rooms too. But I also learned this from a veteran comedian. He said he says your job to make them laugh. They ain't laughing, you doing something right. And I said, well, that's true, but It'll make. Negate the fact that it's hard to make it hard in black room, shit like. But you know, is that you know? But that comes where man, that comes with. You know doing a lot of room to man, mm-hmm, and like I know now in your age what to do if I come across that. And but honestly, you just have to, you have to. You can't give up, you can't run, you just got to dig in deep and find other creative ways to get these people have and there's sometimes it just it.

Speaker 2:

Just that's what happens with stand-up comedy. You just it could be any room, it ain't got to be a black room, they're just sometimes man.

Speaker 2:

It just happens. You know stand-up is, it's hard by nature, but comedy is also, so it's. It's one of them things, man, that you know. You know you have to deal with when you hit the stage every time. But I Tell all comics, man, I say that's why it's important Continue to work your craft, have jokes, because you see these patch of jokes ain't working, then you go over here for these out. But, like I said, the more you get on the stage and do this, you find different loopholes To navigate through to get the audience to laugh and stuff like that. That's when you know you really like what you doing. You know no one likes to sit there and ain't laughing. But I figured it out. I said shit, we're gonna do something.

Speaker 1:

Some what happened.

Speaker 2:

You know, I did.

Speaker 1:

I did bombs for bad one time at a black room. They turned the lights off on me and that's when I started podcasting, took a home. It's like a whole Month and a half for me to get back on the stage and one of the comedians that was actually Um there, he jumped on my podcast. He was like man, you need to get back out. There. It happens. I like brother. That was a tough room.

Speaker 2:

It happens to the best and everybody has experienced it and You're going to experience it and I like it. In the sports, every great athlete has had a bad game or games. Baseball, I'm gonna use baseball, for example, big baseball thing. A Picture can come out there one game, kill it, you might do a new hitter, I Well, he might just have a good game, serve a good game, but then he might come out there, man, and give up three home runs in the first hit. Before you know when he leave, he got three men on the base by the time they pull them, they down six, nothing. And it happens. Or a hitter can go through a awful streak. He can't hit the ball, just can't hit it. Same thing with a slugger in baseball. He may go homeless. No man might not hit no home runs for a long time. Basketball football same thing I could join might be the greatest I ever seen, but he'll tell you he's asked a bag. Yep, so when you, you gonna?

Speaker 2:

It's something like stand up, where a lot of it is about making people laugh. There's a lot of pressure on us To deliver these jokes in a way, in an and in a manner where we can get People. You know you, you know this. There's certain jokes that we tell we have to say it right, it's not gonna be funny. Um, I have a certain jokes I tell I know, if I don't say the word right or I miss a word, they ain't gonna get, they're not gonna get. So you know, it happens. But the thing about it, the more we do this, the more we get in front of people and tell jokes, the more we learn about ourselves and we learn about different things, what we can get people on board to laugh at us but, I'm gonna tell you One thing that works in a comedian's favor, that will, I'm not gonna say really prevent him from bombing, but Kind of give him the benefit.

Speaker 2:

Well, he, you know, he got a like a soft landing pad. He got a cushion. That's when you have a popularity, you have a strong family, what people actually come into your show to hear you. You know they like they like wrong, they like they like didn't get a rocket, like they like our style of comedy. So they're actually coming in here our material. So we might get the benefit of a doubt and get a laugh, even if the joke ain't funny. You see, I'm saying so. If you pack out a place they come to see wrong, you may say something. They might not think it's funny, but they laugh anyway. Or some people go laugh anyway because you're their favorite. So it's the one thing you can have as a comedian that you can put in your back pocket is that when you have a strong family, so you got people to come and actually see you, you win it. You got that on your side versus nobody knows who you are you don't get the benefit of a laugh. But that's why I tell comics all the time is just starting to practice as much as you can in front of people, I don't care if it's one person or a thousand.

Speaker 2:

The more you practice this craft, the more you write, the more you tell jokes, the better you're gonna get. It's just like anything else the more you practice it, the better you're gonna get. What you put into is what you get out of it. So the more you get in front of people and you telling these jokes and you see, this don't work, that don't work and this work and that don't work, you start gaining experience. You say, okay, I know what to do now. When I go into this room and you got a heckler or you have it's predominantly black or some mixed or was older, this and that you start recognizing. Oh, I know what to say to this crowd. Right, I got 10, 15 minutes. Oh, no problem, I'm gonna start with this right here and lead into this. And you Start working for you because now you gaining experience. Okay, I might do some crowd work. I see somebody right here. He looked like such and such. I might jump on that. And before you know it, you don't tell five minutes of jokes off the off the cuff, doing some. You know crowd work and you ain't even got to your main stuff. So the more you do it, the more you find out how this game works. That's why I tell come, best thing you can do is just Continue to write, continue to practice, continuous practice, and you'll get better with it.

Speaker 2:

And I and I always use sports as an example I was an athlete and how you know high school play all the sports and I said, just like playing basketball, you want to get a mean cross-off, you got to practice. You want to get that jumper down? You got to take them jump. You want to learn how to dunk? You got to go out there and practice, you got to practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. That's it, it's no, it's no shortcut to, especially when you are a comedian. We're public speakers who tell jokes. That's it, that's it. That's all we are. And the more you tell jokes in front of people, the better you gonna become. So that's the ultimate way you win. You get better with stand-up and you you avoid the pitfalls of a bombing. It's gonna happen, but who gives who?

Speaker 1:

cares.

Speaker 2:

Bombing ain't gonna die. It's a real bombing. Hell just do good at that day yeah.

Speaker 1:

Here I go to a safe space. It's called the performance playground. Go every Thursday, Okay when I started.

Speaker 1:

Well, went to comedy school at the funny bone here 256 weeks but then I went to the. The performance playground is $5 every Thursday, so I get the bomb there, but when I go out there I kill so much and For it comedians like it's giving the advice about that. One of the methods I use for any type of crowd reaction or interaction or anything like that. I Paul not pause. I put the TV on mute when I watch a stand-up special. It could be the same stand-up special and if you notice how these comedians move like Damon Wayne's, carlos Miller's, some more how they move around and they scope and you see what they saying and seeing they like Dia Huggles, crowd work is amazing. Tk Kirkland I'm like I'm watching the hell out of it. But I'm watching on mute and it's weird. But if you see how they hold the mic, what they, who they look at that you know they gonna say something off the roof. So it's just a little method I do when it comes to jokes.

Speaker 1:

I go to the safe space Sometime. I got a voice recorder I walk around the house with. I start reciting my joke, just like that. But you got to read that room. That room is the most important thing, because you think you got like a bomb 10-minute set, but it didn't really connect with your room. So if you ain't paying attention to that room, that's in there, you ain't gonna. You gonna swim, you gonna float, you ain't gonna. You ain't gonna sink or swim, you gonna float across. But it's not gonna be what you wanted to be.

Speaker 2:

I'm glad you said two things is very important, man. The first thing you said you walk around with a quarter. That's great. I do that too. I I actually Record my jokes on audio and then, like I said, I got really loud right and then I, I put my paper down and then I was, I record myself, like I'm actually on stage and go back and listen to it and Okay, I could, I could. I missed this joke. I say this better and I do that practice. That's one thing. Number two, second thing you said man, um Make, that makes a lot of sense about. You know you watch people and how they. You know you know the famous comedians, you know you mute the television and and you watch their movements. That's that's. That's a good thing.

Speaker 2:

And number three, reading the room is very important. This is something else I learned is, whenever you got a show, depending on how much, how many jokes you have, you should always have Extra set of jokes you may have to use because the room might not be Um, the room might get people's in the room, your jokes might not coincide with those people. So it's good to have another batch of jokes, but it's very important to read the room because, like I said before, you can go in there. You can say, oh man, this crap's a little older. I really gonna understand if I start talking about this urban story. You know, maybe not, but they are black and they're white, okay, so I'm gonna do. I'm gonna go this direction. I'm gonna talk about some universal stuff that black and white do. I'm also talk about some older stuff because I be a little older. So I'm gonna do that. And In order to do that room, you have to have those, those material, that type of material. Only way you're gonna get that type of material is constantly writing and going to these open mics.

Speaker 2:

Because, excuse me, let's just say you just got a good solid 10 minutes. That's all you have. Well, that's all you have. Can you take that anywhere? Probably not. Someone get you for a show, like you said. You get in there. Those jokes are not gonna coincide with the people in that room. Then what you're gonna do and that's how you start bombing.

Speaker 2:

But this is why I always tell comments once you got some jokes down and you know they work, go to the next one. Don't fall in love with your five minutes. Set your 10 minutes. It's not wrong with. You know you got a good five minutes. You want to continue, work on a couple more times, go couple more, but that's fine.

Speaker 2:

But once you know it works, you need to be still writing new material. You gotta, you gotta do that. Whether you collaborate with somebody, you got somebody writing for you. You got to do that. If you don't, you hold you pigeon holding yourself, holding yourself back. That's why I say the more you write, the more you practice, the better you're gonna be. So that way, when you have a show and you read the room and you say, oh man, some of these jokes not gonna work on this crowd, let me dig in my bag and pull up these jokes. Let me clean, clean up and let me pull up these clean set of jokes I have. Or whatever. Let me bring up some jokes about my mama, cuz this. Some women in there does my mommy not gonna talk about how she's whooping? And see, then when you do that, you smooth selling. That's why some of the great ones don't bomb that as much because they've they got so much material.

Speaker 2:

I write all the time because I see having a lot of jokes is like having courtesy in the bank, having money in your savings. I've been writing, I've been doing this eight years and I and I literally have jokes man, I've never used on stage, ever because I've written so much. I just I just think I didn't get to it. There's some jokes I use on stage one time I've never used again. So what I, what I learned to do, is just go back and go over these jokes. Hey, I gotta practice, I gotta see if it works. You know, I know it works.

Speaker 2:

There's some more jokes for me so it's like like people don't know I can. I do clean comedy too. I've done churches and everything about. You know they can do. Yeah, I can do clean. It's about first six, seven shows and I got into the game with clean show as I choose the curse and talk about other stuff. But I can do clean and I have clean company. How I got clean company? I got clean jokes. Everything ain't MF disc elf, you know, say everything ain't got. It's not raw, got cursed words in.

Speaker 2:

But that comes from writing. You know, because you want to have some clean comedy, someone call you up. They may want you to ten minutes on television, whatever you want to be able to do that. So I tell, I tell all commerce, the best thing you can do is write. But the cheat code is and it's not really cheap code because they do this and stand up all the time else will write jokes for you. That's standard in comedy. They all do it. Don't let them tell you differently.

Speaker 2:

I don't get how famous they may be, a lot of them use writers and that's what you supposed to do. It's not wrong with that. Jimmy Kimmel has people to write for him every night. Jimmy Walker they played on good times. Jay Leno and David Letterman used to write for him. You can look it up. They used to write for him. Richard Pry used to collaborate with the late Paul Mooney. You know. It's nothing wrong with that. It's not wrong with having a writer that can write jokes for you. That is standard operation and stand-up comedy. The greats do it all the time. They do it. Don't let all these great, calm comments thank you, you know fool you and have you thinking that they don't use writers.

Speaker 2:

I know for a fact that Tracy Morgan paid this comedian I know who's how hilariously funny paid him for a joke. I know that the Tracy Morgan ain't gonna. He said about right for him, but I know better. I'm not saying about right from all the time, just I'm just giving an example, for I know a comedian that gave a joke to Tracy Morgan. Tracy Morgan paid happens all the time. Yes, these famous comedians have no problems in a room. I give you a thousand dollars, fifteen hundred, for this, but these five minutes of jokes it happens all the time.

Speaker 2:

So I'm saying that to say is that collaborate with other writers right? People come up to me all the time, want to write for me all the time and I and I and I use them. I write my own jokes to, but I also got writers to. So I'm not, I'm not above. Saying that that's part of the end, is just part of the game. And to me is, why wouldn't I take? You know, some of the times it's not funny, but I'm like, hey, I can make it fun, you know. So that's just more material, go to the mics and work on it, and that's more money in the bank that's it.

Speaker 1:

You know, did this comedy special come about cuz you're Amazon Prime with it, right? How'd that come the fruitation with?

Speaker 2:

um. The guy who produced the top banks, top banks, it um recorded. This guy named Mike Miller.

Speaker 2:

You know Mike Miller here in Raleigh mm-hmm okay no other no, yeah, mike Miller, yeah, we call him Mike Miller. Well, I was on Mike mellows first come. Well, I was on. I wasn't on his special, but they filmed it at good nights and I was part of the show and, um, I did like five, six minutes, something like that. So after the show, ty came up to me and say hey, man, think you want to. You know when you want to record your special? I said I had thought about it. He said I know you got the material, you funny, so just have a date. That was in November, matter of fact, I can tell you exact day that was.

Speaker 2:

Mike Miller recorded his comedy special the day before Thanksgiving in November 2017. So that night time I had that discussion and I told Toss, I get back which and give you date. So I got back with Ty and I I did mine on February 24th 2018. But how it happened, ty came out to me, said man, it's cool and do your special. I put it on Amazon Prime and I did 30 something minutes. I actually could have did an hour, but that was my first time doing it, so I just, I just did. He said you do at least 30. I did 30, 33 minutes and that's how I came to, for it's top things. We stopped to me we was already doing stuff together anyway, because I'm the host of the Lickahouse comedy show but he came up to me say let's go ahead and shoot the special. You know, I seen you in action, you funny. I know you got the material. So yeah, let's do it, that's all. That's all that.

Speaker 1:

I'm glad you said the 30 minutes thing, because most of specials I watch on max, you know, and I see a lot of them now going pivot towards that shorter time frame we're back. Then you would get a hour special if you got like a dang cook paper few special you would got like two, three hours. But you see that 30 minutes thing going and then you see now the shorts and the reels and I go on viral than the actual two, three minute skit. So yeah that you were actually ahead of the market with that one.

Speaker 2:

So yeah, well, honestly, man, people got short stitches. Fan, like I said before, when you were comedian, just look at us as public speakers to tell it jokes. And also you probably can relate to this when it comes to pastors. A lot of pastors would tell you that you, you know they used to have these long sermons in church black churches but they started noticing people. It was start losing the audience, so their church members in the speech, the longer it was, people just zone out. So what?

Speaker 2:

What happened is, I think, with the stand up, as humans, we just want, we don't want long, no more. We won't short, you know, we want something that's quick. So 30 minutes is fine, because if I'm Whether I'm preaching, I'm giving some information or I'm telling jokes, I have to be interested. How can I be interested in for an hour? How can I be interested for 45 minutes? How can I be interested for 30? Why not shoot for 30? And I think what's happening with the human development, everybody attention span? It's no longer like it used to be. It's we won't quit. That's why, when you do reels, facebook would tell you they keep it. They want you to keep it under 60 seconds for a reason because research has shown. That's how long people attention saying and 60 seconds is the max. Yeah, I've even read where is you can do 30 seconds reels. That's even better Because that way they can put advertising on and everything.

Speaker 2:

People don't. Our teachers fans are getting less and less now. So I'm fine with 30 minutes watching somebody, versus now Now, what I love to see. An hour with David should build them absolutely, because I've seen it. But I'll be content with 30 minutes. To be honest with you, I'm content with 20 minutes. You know, and I think that's where we're as humans. I think that's where we're going because our tension spans are short. Like, if you put any reels on any reels of videos on Facebook, you go to the analytics for it'll show you the retention span of the people that watch 17 seconds, they watch 25 seconds. How many watched it for this amount of seconds? And if you watch it, you'll see that says a 60 minute, 60 second video. You'll see how it tails off with so many people watch the full video, unless it's something really, really funny, but you'll see how it tails off. Yeah, because people just Attention spans are just. I don't know what it is, it's just people don't want to sit there all day now, you know.

Speaker 1:

No, yeah, so anything about it.

Speaker 2:

Sometimes less is less is more. I mean, I mean, there's some specials man, I love these comments and they kill it for an hour, but I'll probably be fine with 30 minutes. I ain't gonna sit in line.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

It's just like church man the best sermons have always been you have a long sermon and kill it, but you can still just be as impactful if it's 35 minutes or 40 minutes.

Speaker 1:

I see you do a lot more than about to be to yeah, yeah, I do.

Speaker 2:

That's because I'm on to be.

Speaker 1:

That's not, but that's not Netflix. I'm not gonna lie. And for people out there we make I make jokes about to be, but if you really look at it it's, it's a. It's a blessing, right, cuz you got more black creators going towards the to be. You got more black comedians specials going to to be, like TK Kirkland, tony Baker, bone, hampton, you. You see a lot of us going towards to to be, and one of the best things that's ever happened to to be is when HBO did not want to pay union workers, so they sold half a catalog To to be, so stuff like Lovecraft country, the new space jam, they went over to to be, so it actually brought in a different audience of it. So how has to be been for you? Because this, because you have two apps that I've seen Kated towards this to be, and some people don't know about this one crackle.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, yeah how has to be been, because this it's been a movement since the pandemic, or probably before the pandemic.

Speaker 2:

The lockdown, I'm glad you brought up to be because the guy top banks, who, who puts all all his stuff on to be, had been talking about to be for years Before it got popular with black people. So when he would tell these comedians about recording a look at house comedy, putting on to be TV, a Lot of black people saw it ain't on Netflix, you know. Blah, blah, blah, blah. Well, lo and behold, just like I knew what happened, to be was gonna blow up to be, but to be was was already popular before the pandemic. Once the pandemic hit, everybody was home and everybody like free to be. Tv is free. Once that happened, black people called, called on to it and Once black people caught on to it, to be became even bigger in black people minds, even though to be was already a big deal. So, by top, putting all this stuff on there and now he has the eyeballs of the black people is really helped.

Speaker 2:

A lot of us who's already on to be like myself Because I'm the host of the look at house comedy show a Lot of people see me on that. I'm into the best movies on on to be TV to crime, urban dramas, messy and hit a lick too. I'm the main character hit a little too and it's done wonders for my career and it's opened up other doors because I'm getting off of a lot of different things, because so many people see me on to be now, whether I'm doing stand-up comedy, or they see me playing a serious role as a, as a gangster, and hit a lick too. So it's really helped me out a lot because Now black people are people. They have. They see, oh man, to be the real deal now and you know how black people are, once they deem something to be worthy in their eyes, then it's a real deal, even though to be it always been a real deal. But it has really helped me out tremendously.

Speaker 2:

And stand up and in the acting world, because I'm getting off on a lot of different things, I'm getting stopped in the streets. People they mount you the guy you know where the robe on the stage, aren't you the guy that played in this movie? Blah, blah, blah. I'm getting producers to hit me up when we being movies and stuff. So it's been a blessing and I'm glad, I'm happy for it because you know I'm working with a great guy in Ty banks who we just finished another movie, about to start another movie, all this gonna be on to be and it's really helped me Be on my brand as a comedian, as an actor, and I absolutely love it. I love it too, man, because a lot of us just on there just producing and putting these movies out here, and the one thing I don't like is when I hear black people say, oh man, this must be some type of to be movie, as they'll to be is a black owned Network.

Speaker 2:

But even if it is, why would you want to down and network and network? That's putting black people in there and giving these black people the visibility that they need. And I think that's some of the the most ignorant shit ever is to downplay something where you see a lot of people of color to look like you. This on it is every movie on to be Outstanding from you know no, but it's a platform where you can watch people that look like yourself on there and Just act like every single solid-chef movie on to be is awful, is? It's almost like saying if it's black is not good, and that's the one negative.

Speaker 2:

I hate when I see people um on social media like to make negative comments about To be because they trying to associate it with oh, if it's just on to be, it's a black movie and it's probably not that good. And that pisses me off, because there are a lot of black movies on to be that are. The action was good, the technical part is good, the plots are good, everything about it is good. So when I hear black people say that man, I take offense to it because you're putting down your own race of people when you shouldn't be doing that anyway. You know you can find it white movies that got bad actors bad. Okay, so it's. It's not just a a racial thing. You can, you can pick any movie, I don't care who makes it based off their color, and you can find you something negative.

Speaker 2:

But I hate when I hear black people say that oh, man, this must be a two-beat movie. That ain't, and I hate that. Yeah, I don't know if black people Recognize that some of us are just programming a hate Anything that black people do. But aside from that negative stuff, I absolutely love it on to be man, it's the best thing ever, it's a blessing, and to be A part to know a guy who I grew up with that has helped my comedy and acting career is nothing but a blessing to God and I pray, I think God every day that I'm in this position. I'm humbled by it. I don't take it for granted and I'm I'm just happy to be in the spaces of man right now. You know, as I act as this last medium, you know, and then also to build a platform like this to talk about it more. There's also another black man to help, you know, raise exposure for what.

Speaker 1:

Whatever you doing to yeah, man, I See, let me. Let me just jump on to two. They have to be originals. Yes and I'm talking about shows and movies. They have live television they had had. I watched this movie sentiment with one of my favorite comedians in there, damon Wang, as it was a great movie. And I'm like this is a to be original and it's deep because you know how social media works. I'll lab will spread further than the truth.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I say if you would just sit down, just watch this stuff, like you're up there, murder pain is up there. I forgot his name. We played biggie Smalls in the notorious movie he's killing it, man, robinson. Um, it's like that you do get some one, some movies and some shows like alright, this is yeah, but you also got some that's in there with you also get White movies and shows is like man I, that shit Shouldn't even be.

Speaker 1:

I need you know me To be in my opinion and I'm not trying to put no other network down to be in my opinion has surpassed the Netflix because Thank you, thank you, I've been saying this.

Speaker 2:

I have been saying this and people think I'm crazy. I'm like no, go back to what I said earlier, to be had been out for a long time for while, when top banks was telling people about to be and how good, how great it was and how the exposure can get, a Lot of comedians didn't understand it. They didn't get it because once again, black people thought Netflix was a big deal because they saw that as A lot of a lot of value. You know saying so.

Speaker 2:

I had to, I had to educate these people say listen, they were running to be as on TNT Network, all these other major networks, port shows and everything. So I'm like how's it a rooty poof? You know network and I've always knew this was gonna happen. Because it's free, people are free and and that's why you got all these shows on there cuz two bees a big deal. That's why they bought half the kettlelough from HBO and Luggages is free, people gonna watch it and that's and that's why I'm glad you said that, that's why I'm so glad that you bought that up To be as, just as big as Netflix. People just don't understand that.

Speaker 1:

They don't. They don't. Netflix is horrible in some, in some, as I don't have never had Netflix in over a year Because I was finding out that I couldn't find nothing, but I'm paying With 999 at the time and then you can't share the password and stuff like that. Let me tell you how much to be means to me. I ain't got put my login in my password in. I Ain't got put no complicated password with 13 special characters in there and I think I got I got stuck in some rabbit holes in there. But it reminds me and I'm older, I'm a little older to put people think it reminds me back then when stars had those like different networks, but it was stars black.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they used to have stars black.

Speaker 1:

That's what to be reminds me of, and that's when they had, like Malibu, the fat fat beat. She's to come up there. You would see, right, all these different people he like me with the hell going on, and that's that's what it was. That's that really what it was. It's opened up so many doors. I've seen so many stand-up specials and my ass that have been better than the ones is on the bigger networks and these are from Ella Camila I saw I Knew to was was definitely pivoting somewhere when I saw that the LOL network by Kevin Hart.

Speaker 1:

Right come up there when he put LOL network up, that's. Oh yeah, kevin must see something that we ain't.

Speaker 2:

It's free, and if it's free, everybody likes free. Yeah, more people gonna Gonna tune into it. So Kevin was like, hey, that makes sense, let me put it on there Because I know it's free and more people gonna come to it because it's free, versus they got a. It was. It was very business-wise on his part since was man?

Speaker 1:

uh, I appreciate you doing this interview. Actually, I got it at interview. Dante Williams he's out of your neck of the woods. He told me about you and it was like a Saturday we did a show together and I was like, yeah, I'm gonna check him out. And I checked you out and I didn't know how to approach you.

Speaker 2:

I was like man, I'm gonna see you out.

Speaker 1:

So when I sent the clip I was like let's see if he notices. And you started commenting back and forth. We did the jokes and I was like I started digging more into your resume. I was like, all right, let's see if I can get him on the show. So amen, I appreciate you coming up here and before we.

Speaker 2:

I appreciate you having me man. I appreciate it. I appreciate the opportunity. Man. Anything I can do to help, I'm down for it. I appreciate y'all.

Speaker 1:

Say less, man Humble by it.

Speaker 2:

Very humble by it.

Speaker 1:

I need to make my way down there. Actually, I actually will be there in October, october, doing some stuff. If anybody wants to reach out to you, see your content online, what could they follow you at?

Speaker 2:

Okay, on Facebook. I have two pages on Facebook. I'm gonna start with my Ghetto Ratchi page. You put in Ghetto Ratchi, g-h-e-t-t-o-r-a-c-h-i. That's my comedy page, and my main Facebook page is Donnell Kearney in parentheses, think Ghetto Ratchi. They can find me there. Instagram Ghetto Ratchi, tiktok, ghetto Ratchi. Youtube, that's my government name Donnell Kearney, ghetto Ratchi. You put it in there, it'll come up. That's how they can find me on social media.

Speaker 2:

I'm also an author. Anybody want you know like to read. I got a book out there, a very inspirational book called the Sparrow Will Fly, put in Dink Kearney, k-e-a-r-n-e-y and the name of the book is the Sparrow Will Fly Very inspirational book doing really good. I'm also an entrepreneur. I have my own shoe design. It's called the G. Yes, it's called the G. Quote the G. If you go to a liveshoescom and you type in the G, my shoe will come up. I've actually designed three pairs, but one pair is the one that I'm actually selling and I'm doing pretty good with that. And you also can find my website, dinkkerniecomedycom, and on that page you'll see all the things I've done.

Speaker 2:

You also can order a robe. Don't wear a robe on stage. You also can yeah, you also can order a shirt. I got a shirt called Make America Ghetto Ratchi again. Yeah, that's right, make America Ghetto Ratchi again. The white people love it. They've even told me they say that's the only MAGA shirt they'll wear. So feel free to go to a website, order your robe. The robe may take you a couple of weeks to get because it got there, professionally made by my personal designer. The same thing with a Make America Ghetto Ratchi shirt too. I got the shirt. So hand so you hit me up, you click on the link, order the shirt I got you. That'll be sent to you in no time. So that's how you can find me people.

Speaker 2:

And also continue to watch Hitalik 2 on Messi. We're about to start shooting Hitalik 3 soon. That's an urban crime drama. I am not funny in that movie at all. I am a straight, full gangster. So check that out, check out Messi and, before we go, definitely check out my comedy special, ghetto Ratchi, on Amazon Prime. I appreciate the support. It's actually one of the best comedy specials In terms of the ratings on Amazon Prime. I wanna thank all my fans and people out there who've been supporting me. I'm very humbled by that and I always tell people the more stars I get the better. So five stars. Treat me like I'm a high school all-American. Give me that five stars, baby.

Speaker 1:

Even if you don't like the comedy special, Just give it to me that five stars, baby.

Speaker 2:

Even if I don't make you laugh, just give it to me. Treat me like you treat the famous to you. I you know yeah. So, that's pretty much how you can find me, man Hell, if you just Google Dink Kearney, everything will probably come up anyway.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I heard that right, Google. This man has several businesses and streams of income Support him. Watch the special, check him out online. Click the links in the bio. I promise you would not be disappointed. I thought he was gonna have the robe and the hat on today for the interview.

Speaker 2:

Hey, if you, hey, you know what? I don't want any thinking, I should have put it on man. I should have put my robe on man. I just normally I have my robe on when I do these interviews. I do because I actually walk around with my robe. I love robes. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, hey, you guys, man, check me out comedian Rome. That's on Instagram, twitter, and Rome Davis on Facebook. Noid is the podcast. They're streaming all networks, all services, streaming services. Noid Media TV that is the platform where it has my comedy and these interviews as well too. So not only will you get jewels, you also get laughs. You'll get stories. Make it a couple of skits. I think I put a video of me singing to a cougar from the other night. Oh, my joy.

Speaker 1:

That's what's up man but like, support black content, black creatives in general. Go check out his book, check out the shoes, check out the comedy, check out the comedy special, check out the skits, check out everything that this man is doing. I'm telling you right now because, who knows, in the next two, three years was already a house thing. This is gonna be a Billboard name, ladies and gentlemen. So check out Gatorace man. Like, check this man. I promise you will not be disappointed. The only thing I'm mad about is I ain't see the robe and cowboy hat today. But you know what? We're gonna probably get him back on for another episode.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, man, I got you. I definitely got you, man. Yeah, I got you. Matter of fact, I gave me a new cowboy hat. Man, I gotta give him a more stylish to go with my new robe, the one you see, the blue and yellow. The blue robe, we got the yellow belt. That's my signature robe right there, yeah. So I gotta get another cowboy hat that's more professional to go with. That gotta look good when I put it on.

Speaker 1:

That'll look good, that'll look good, we're going good and signed off man. This is Ron Davis. This is Gatorace on NoID Media TV, NoID Podcast. This is just like his comedy unfiltered, raw and edited. This is 100% this man right here, so check us out. I appreciate you, brother. I'm gonna go ahead and sign off.

Speaker 2:

Appreciate you, man. Thanks for having me, man. God bless you, man. Anything I can do to help you, I will and much continue success, all right.

Speaker 1:

Thank you, sir.

Interview With Comedian Ghetto Rache
Navigating the Challenges of Stand-Up Comedy
Writing and Collaboration in Stand-Up Comedy
To Be's Impact on Black Entertainment
Promotion of an Entertainer's Various Ventures
Discussing Robe, Cowboy Hat, Comedy Podcast

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